Author Archives: Cedar Riener

About Cedar Riener

College psychology professor, husband, father.

Social Media as a Catalyst for Psychological Science

Can social media serve as a catalyst for psychological science? I think many scientists are rightly skeptical of social media as a replacement for other normal scientific processes. Peer review will not be replaced by Tweep Review. Methods sections will not be … Continue reading

Posted in psychology, science, web | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Social Media as a Catalyst for Psychological Science – My presentation

At the recent Association for Psychological Science annual convention, I co-chaired a symposium on “Social Media as a Catalyst for Psychologist Science.” In my next post I will give some context to the entire session, but first, here is my … Continue reading

Posted in psychology, science | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

On Controversial College Speakers, Debating and Critical Thinking

Azusa Pacific University recently disinvited Charles Murray from giving a talk there. The talk had been scheduled for months, but apparently no one realized the full extent of his bad reputation. He wrote an open letter in response. Although regular readers … Continue reading

Posted in science | 2 Comments

Thumb on the PayScale

In my last post, I took issue with the PayScale college rankings, as well as with how economics reporters framed these rankings, citing their low calculated Return on Investment as evidence that these colleges “make” students poor. Jordan Weissmann has graciously responded to my critique. … Continue reading

Posted in education, higherEd, psychology, science | Tagged , , , | 21 Comments

The Absurdity of Ranking Colleges by Graduate Salaries

Jordan Weissman has moved from the Atlantic, and is now covering economics at Slate. He has a post up provocatively titled (it is Slate, after all) “What College Will Leave you Poorest?” which covers the Payscale college salary rankings, in which … Continue reading

Posted in education, higherEd, science | Tagged , | 7 Comments

Grit and Galton: Is psychological research into traits inherently problematic?

Is all psychological research on individual differences racist? Can psychologists ever separate our shameful past of scientific racism from the methods, techniques and questions that have grown from it? A recent post criticizing the concept of “grit” (and Angela Duckworth, … Continue reading

Posted in education, psychology, research, science | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

On Treating the Unprepared as if they were Unmotivated and Unworthy

An academic job market story yesterday reminded me of the perils of interpreting lack of preparation with lack of worth. A philosophy candidate for a job at Nazareth College in Rochester was offered the job, made some fairly common requests, … Continue reading

Posted in science | Tagged , , | 12 Comments

How much does it matter how students feel?

As I prepare my tenure portfolio, I am catching up on entering in my student evaluation data and comments into my big spreadsheet. While I don’t think student evaluations should serve as the only data by which to judge teachers, … Continue reading

Posted in education, higherEd, psychology | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

Oh I get tenure, with a little help from my friends

To continue from my last post, one of the elements that disturbed me about defining scientist as “gets grants, has groundbreaking ideas” is not just that this narrow definition of scientist excludes worthy people, but also that it excludes certain … Continue reading

Posted in higherEd, science | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

Tents, Tribes and Lonely Islands: Who Gets to Be a Scientist?

A recent post by thoughtful, charismatic, and talented friend Scicurious on how the “system” of science training failed her, but should have failed her sooner has gotten me thinking a lot about my role in the science “system.” Sci’s argument … Continue reading

Posted in science | Tagged , | 11 Comments