Author Archives: Cedar Riener

About Cedar Riener

College psychology professor, husband, father.

On Treating the Unprepared as if they were Unmotivated and Unworthy

An academic job market story yesterday reminded me of the perils of interpreting lack of preparation with lack of worth. A philosophy candidate for a job at Nazareth College in Rochester was offered the job, made some fairly common requests, … Continue reading

Posted in science | Tagged , , | 12 Comments

How much does it matter how students feel?

As I prepare my tenure portfolio, I am catching up on entering in my student evaluation data and comments into my big spreadsheet. While I don’t think student evaluations should serve as the only data by which to judge teachers, … Continue reading

Posted in education, higherEd, psychology | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments

Oh I get tenure, with a little help from my friends

To continue from my last post, one of the elements that disturbed me about defining scientist as “gets grants, has groundbreaking ideas” is not just that this narrow definition of scientist excludes worthy people, but also that it excludes certain … Continue reading

Posted in higherEd, science | Tagged , , | 7 Comments

Tents, Tribes and Lonely Islands: Who Gets to Be a Scientist?

A recent post by thoughtful, charismatic, and talented friend Scicurious on how the “system” of science training failed her, but should have failed her sooner has gotten me thinking a lot about my role in the science “system.” Sci’s argument … Continue reading

Posted in science | Tagged , | 11 Comments

On the Benefits of “Overreaction” – #IStandwithDNLee

First, a few of my beliefs, to clarify the provocative title and scare quotes: Our society doesn’t react strongly enough to the subtle racism, sexism, and generic cruelty experienced by minorities in many communities. The reaction to the specific situation … Continue reading

Posted in science | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments

Student Learning and Labor Policies, follow up

My piece for the Atlantic ran yesterday, on how student learning is not directly connected to exploitative labor policies. I had some interesting conversations, on twitter and over email, so I thought I would share those with my readers. It … Continue reading

Posted in higherEd, politics, science, teaching | Tagged , , , | 3 Comments

Teaching and learning, labor and fairness

It seems a requirement that any conversation about higher education in America must begin and end with costs and economic outcomes. Along the way, our economic analysts nod to the power of knowledge (economic research shows it improves career prospects!), … Continue reading

Posted in education, higherEd, politics, teaching | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments